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electric mic
04-11-08, 10:03 PM
Hi guys,

Anyone a fan of the cafe racer style of bikes? Personally I love them and that style of self-modding.

I finally got around to Deus ex last week when I blew through Sydney and it was epic! Really got me keen to finally grab my license.

Tommo
04-11-08, 10:22 PM
Nice... what self modding have you got planned?

electric mic
06-11-08, 10:48 PM
step 1 buy an SR400

then I was thinking rat rod style with JDM influence lol. Sounds crap but it works in my head.

Garth Ivers
06-11-08, 11:05 PM
rat rod sr's?

look no further

http://www.bratstyle.com/

TOU93
07-11-08, 11:34 AM
That's awesome except the handle bars. If they were just slight rise ones would look heaps better IMO!

SN34KN
07-11-08, 03:04 PM
Hi guys,

Anyone a fan of the cafe racer style of bikes? Personally I love them and that style of self-modding.

I finally got around to Deus ex last week when I blew through Sydney and it was epic! Really got me keen to finally grab my license.

If you buy from Deus, talk to Mikey from there. He's a mate and usually pretty happy to help out people with a passion. Esp with helping you find bits and peices for your project. He's been into various bikes for years! (and he's absolutly halarious which helps)

electric mic
09-11-08, 03:14 PM
rat rod sr's?

look no further

http://www.bratstyle.com/

Damn Garth, is there anything you don't know about on the interweb? Good hook up, cheers.

And yeah I love Deus, great place and good bunch of blokes too.

Garth Ivers
11-11-08, 03:44 PM
hahaha, being an addict has its benefits i suppose

Justin Fox
11-11-08, 04:19 PM
I love Cafe Racers. More the upright stance and no fairing nonsense.

Here's a Yammy that a bicycle store owner friend has just put together:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3276/2839097280_2ff9ea5e1e_o.jpg

danielb
11-11-08, 05:10 PM
Man thats so fucking cool. call me a massive noob but it looks like a dry sump setup, wheres the oil tank been moved too?

I dont think the stance would be that upright on that bike justin would it? The clipons look relatively low slung

benxxx
11-11-08, 06:51 PM
Cafe racers to me are cool, but nothing more, I'd never own one over a bike with a purpose (ie Sports bike or Dirt bike etc)

Garth Ivers
11-11-08, 10:07 PM
Man thats so fucking cool. call me a massive noob but it looks like a dry sump setup, wheres the oil tank been moved too?

oil tank? eh? thats an air-cooled single

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_cylinder_engine

danielb
17-11-08, 10:36 AM
My bike is an air-cooled single, and has an oil tank because it's a dry sump setup... That wiki link doesn't even mention what type of lubrication the single-cylinder engine uses?

brasher
17-11-08, 12:01 PM
The oil for my bike is stored in the frame, it's pretty cool how they do that.

Garth Ivers
17-11-08, 03:55 PM
yep in the frame on the sr400 too


1976 witnessed the debut of both the SR400-a bike with a super-long reign as a top seller in the mid-range class and that even now maintains a deep-rooted popularity in Japan-and its sister bike, the SR500.

The SR400 was born with the air-cooled, 4-stroke, overhead cam, 2-valve, single-cylinder, 399-cc engine from the big XT500 off-roader, but with a shortened stroke and refined for road sports use. Equipped with a decompression lever, dry sump oil lubrication that used a portion of the frame for its tank, and a kick indicator for the kick-start engine, the SR400 started more easily than any single-cylinder motorcycle had up to that point. The front fork, the rims and the brakes were all taken from the TX650 and the tires employed a semi-block pattern for running on dirt, like a flat-tracker.

In 1985, a drum brake was adopted in the front, and the front wheel size was dropped from 19 inches to 18 in order to produce a retro look. Greater reliability was also targeted for the engine through a change in oil lines as well as other parts. From 2001, hydraulic front disc brakes were installed, and the SR400 evolved to a machine that provided even greater enjoyment during acceleration and deceleration than was usual for a sports bike.

Since this is a single-cylinder bike, you'll experience the advantages of the lightweight, compact, slim body as soon as you get on. Not only is it easy to balance at a stop, but Yamaha's return of the footpeg position to that of the initial model, coupled with the repeated improvements made to the seat, were also effective in creating a comfortable riding position with only a slight bending of the knees.
The motor is still kick-started, but no special knack is required; the engine awakens with only a grip of the decompression lever and a light step down on the kick pedal, without any need whatsoever to think about top dead center.

Handling displays a calm, straightforward character from beginning to end, and the engine also doesn't necessarily value response over all else. Rather than winding all the way up to high revs, shift up a little bit early and you'll experience a smoother ride while enjoying the beat of the engine and the surrounding scenery. That's the kind of relaxed running that's most suitable for the gorgeous SR400.

haikii
17-11-08, 07:13 PM
thats so sexy Justin... I really might invest back into my bike license again.. i've never really found a bike that tickled my fancy so much... haha are cafe racers all custom bikes? i've got no idea in this stuff

Garth Ivers
17-11-08, 07:37 PM
A Café racer, originally pronounced "caff" (as in Kaff) racer, is a type of motorcycle as well as a type of motorcyclist. Both meanings have their roots in the 1960s British counterculture group the Rockers or the Ton Up Club, although they were also common in Italy and Germany and other European countries.

Rockers were a young and rebellious Rock and Roll counterculture that wanted a fast, personalised and distinctive bike to travel between transport cafés along the newly built arterial motorways in and around British towns and cities. The goal of many was to be able to reach 100 miles per hour (called simply "the ton") along such a route where the rider would leave from a cafe, race to a predetermined point and back to the cafe before a single song could play on the jukebox, this was called record-racing. They are remembered as being especially fond of Rockabilly music and their image is now embedded in today's rockabilly culture.

A classic example of this was to race from the Ace Cafe on The North Circular road in NW London to the Hanger Lane junction as it then was - it is now the more famous Hanger Lane Gyratory System - and back again. The aim was to get back to the Ace Cafe before the record you'd put onto the jukebox had finished. Given that some of the Eddie Cochran tunes that were in vogue at this time were less than 2 minutes long, the racers would have had to traverse the three miles round trip at extremely high speed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caf%C3%A9_racer

electric mic
17-11-08, 08:30 PM
thats so sexy Justin... I really might invest back into my bike license again.. i've never really found a bike that tickled my fancy so much... haha are cafe racers all custom bikes? i've got no idea in this stuff

My thoughts exactly. I never really liked bikes until these... who knows they will probably get me into the other styles I'd say. This is how it usually starts huh gents?

electric mic
17-11-08, 09:50 PM
yep in the frame on the sr400 too

Where did you get that info from Garth?

edit: I mean the big quote

DuGong
17-11-08, 10:01 PM
what about the SR-V

they sound pretty hot!

Garth Ivers
17-11-08, 10:14 PM
Where did you get that info from Garth?

edit: I mean the big quote

google, i might go edit the SR400 wiki now..

Beau
18-11-08, 08:12 AM
errrr Beau's most hated words... "Rat Rod"

Rob86
19-11-08, 06:33 PM
sr400's and 500's are "oil in frame" bikes, instead of there being and external tank (usually looks like a catch tank kind of) the oil is stored in the frame top tube and covered by the tank, i think triumph were one of the first to do it. also some models store/share engine oil in the gearbox/primary casing.

if you guys like cafe racers also look into "flat trackers" or flat track racing, drift fans especially and check out www.jockeyjournal.com for old school bike goodness.

Garth Ivers
11-12-08, 02:02 PM
from a buell lightning to this magnificence

http://www.hidemo.net/modules/choppers/images/img/glory01.jpg

http://www.hidemo.net/modules/choppers/index.php?content_id=40

its just oozing awesome.....