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Thread: Car care tips

  1. #41
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dann View Post
    Just wondering Dave, If I were to get in touch with you when funds permit, perhaps you could organise a "kit" of your products for me to purchase that covers everything I will need? Can PM you with more details if you wish to not clog up your thread and can discuss overall price. Will be starting fresh with new car and town I live in currently only has Big W and Super Cheap both of which, have limited to no range of car care products.
    Thanks
    I would be more than happy to customise a car care kit up for you.
    PM me with what you have in mind and we can mix and match to suit your needs.

    Cheers
    Dave
  2. #42
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Machine Polishing

    There are 2 types of units which can be used to polish and correct a cars paint.

    First is the Random Oribital (dual action) polisher.
    The random orbit is highly recommended if you have never used a machine polisher before as it does not have the speed and cutting power as what a rotary does which minimises the chance of damaging or burining the paint.
    A RO rotates but also orbits side to side giving the same type of action as when polishing by hand in a circular motion. This allows the pad to move over a slightly larger area so it doesnt generate too much heat in one spot too quickly.

    RO are mainly used to apply LSP (last step products. ie. wax/sealants) but can also be used for correcting light paint imperfections and to enhance the paint.
    I use the Festool ETS/150 which has speed settings from 1-5.
    http://www.festool.com.au/mediandowe...69&AKTIVPROD=1

    When polishing paint with the RO I apply 3 drops of polish (roughly the size of 5c pieces) onto the pad then smear it onto the paint surface. Work on an area about 50x50cms at a time. Once the product is smeared, place the pad flat onto the surface and start it on its lowest speed and work in an up/down or side to side motion covering the area that you are working on. Gradually dump the speed up but dont speed it up too much to the point where it feels like its hard to controll.
    After a few passes or when the product looks like its breaking down, gradually slow down the speed until product has been worked enough.
    If the product starts dusting up then that is when it has been fully worked and can go no further.

    When applying LSP's with the RO you pretty much use the same process as when polishing but you will not need to increase the speed as much because all you are wanting to do is to spread the LSP evenly over the surface you are applying it onto.

    Rotary
    If you are looking to polish with a rotary but have never used one in the past then it is highly recommended you start off with a RO. If you want to give the rotary a go then it is recommended that you practise on some test panels first.

    Rotary's are used to correct heavier paint imperfections where a RO just wont cut it.
    Rotary's work at a much faster speed and cut alot more quicker which is why it is only recommended for people that have had experience with one as it generates heat pretty quicky and can burn though paint edges if not constanly kept in motion.

    I use the Makita 9227CB which has a speed range of 600-3000rpm but I only ever go as high as 1800rpm.

    The polishing method is similar to the RO but you really need to watch the speed because if it is rotating too fast then it can easily bite onto the paint and can cause the rotary to throw itself wherever it wants to go
    This is something that japanese made cars are known for as they have very soft and sticky paints.

    OK the process.
    Apply 3 drops on product onto the pad and smear it onto the surface. Work a 50x50cm area at a time.
    Place the pad flat on the surface and start it on its lowerst speed. 600rpm.
    Move the rotary in a up/down, side to side motion gradually bumping the speed up to 900, 1200 then 1500rpm.
    If it gets to the point where is feels like its biting, slow the speed down to where it is controlable. Make sure the pad is flat on the surface as this can cause it to bite even more and generate heat.
    If it is still biting then you can give the surface a light spray with a QD to help lubricate and let the pad glide over the surface better.
    Work the product for a few passes then gradually slow it down to 1200, 900 then 600rpm.
    The higher speeds are for correcting and the lower speeds help refine the paint and reduce the amount of buffer trails or hazing left behind from the heavy polishing.

    After polishing each section. Spray a quick detailer or IPA solution and buff off residue with a MF towel and check the results.

    When selecting what pad and polish combo will work to remove the paint defects, always start at the lowest grade. Do a test section on a panel and see if it delivers the results you are after. If not, step up with the grade of pad first as it does not have a big of a gap in abrasive grades as what products have.

    Happy detailing

    Cheers
    Dave
  3. #43
    Member cazSW20's Avatar
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    Felt the results of your work yesterday on a mate's car, i must say im very impressed.

    The fact that you managed to shift that tree sap is great!
  4. #44
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cazSW20 View Post
    Felt the results of your work yesterday on a mate's car, i must say im very impressed.

    The fact that you managed to shift that tree sap is great!
    Thanks mate.
    Had to try a few different things to get the sap to even budge but it all turned out well.
    Do you know if he managed to get his car started??
    Also, heard the bad news about your car mate. Hope your alright.

    Cheers
    Dave
  5. #45
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Quick Detailers

    Quick detailers have mainly been used by professional detailers as a final inspection of their work or a finishing touch to a detail.

    Quick detailers can be used for a number of things such as:
    -Clay Lubricant
    -temporary protection and shine(2-3 weeks)
    -to clean/wash your car
    Some can also be used for interior cleaning aswell.

    Quick detailers contain biodegradable cleaners and citrus and also has a range of essential polymers and oils. These help the concentrate clean and protect your vehicle without stripping off any wax which has been applied.

    How to clean your car with Quick Detailers

    If you are one of the many enthusiasts which would like to clean your car every week or two but never have the time to then this is for you.
    Quick detailers can help clean fresh contaminants such as droppings, treesap, water spots which have not had enough time to bake itself onto the paint.
    You will need:
    -a bucket of diluted car wash solution(for heavily soiled areas)
    -Duster
    -Quick Detailer
    -a few microfibre towels
    First, dust your car down with a scratch safe duster making sure you shake the duster after each panel to release any dirt which have been picked up by the fibres.
    Once dusting is done, spray a generous amount of QD spray onto the panel or work area and wipe off with microfibre towel in one direction. When the towel looks soiled, flip it over and repeat throughout the rest of the car.
    Once the whole car is done, go over the car again but this time spray it on and buff it off. This will create a little more shine and added protection.

    When you have all this down pat, it should only take you about 10-15 minutes to do the exterior of your car.

    Driven Quick spray is what I use myself as this is a concentrate and can be diluted to specific ratios for extra shine, lubricity and cleaning/polishing power. If you apply Driven quick spray after each intial wash, it will add more depth and clarity to your vehicles paint, Even more so if it is buffed on by machine.

    *Note- washing with QD is only for vehicles which is kept in good condition and only have fresh contaminants on it. For heavily soiled areas, it is recommended to wash with a car wash solution first*

    Happy Motoring
  6. #46
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Nearly everyone I speak to asks about polishing their vehilce but seems to be gobb smacked when I mention all the different methods that can be used so heres a bit of a run down on polishes and methods which can be used to polish up your car.

    Wet Sanding
    Wet sanding is where really fine sand paper (1400-2000 grit) is used to level out paint finishes or to spot remove imperfections. This is used only when buffing and polishing will not be effective enough to remove the defect because constant machine polishing in one spot can lead to burning the paint.
    Once the imperfection is levelled out as much as possible you will need to polish the paint to remove the marks left from wetsanding.


    Compounding
    Compounding is where a heavey cutting polish is used to remove heavey oxidation, scratches and fading in the clear.
    With Hondas having fairly soft paints you wil find that heavey compounding will not be nessassary unless the paint has been very neglected.
    Products- Menzerna Powergloss/IP, Prima Cut, Megs Ultra cut compound.

    Polishing
    A polish is a medium to light abrasive which is designed to remove light oxidation, light scratches and swirls and any RIDS(rotary induced dealer swirls) or buffer trails left by heavey compounding. Polsihing will also leave the paint with a nice glossy finish.
    Products- Menzerna 106ff/85rd, Prima swirl/Finish, PB swirl removers, Megs #9

    Glaze
    This is a non abrasive polish which is also known as fillers. Some people are against glazes/fillers but they do have a place in the detailing world.
    Glazes are best used when there is not a suffecient amount of clear left on the paint to do a decent correction on. Glazes will help fill in light swirls and scratches and leave the paint with a smooth slick feel. Glazes can also be used as a paint enhancer after a correction is done.
    Prima Amigo is the only glaze at the moment which is polymer based which means it can have an application of sealant or wax applied straight on top of it.

    Cheers
    Dave
  7. #47

    i will definitely call you out for a service for paint correction this month mate. how well does your service remove medium to light scratches on black paint. plus how long does it take for a paint correction service. either stage 1 or 2. thanks
  8. #48
    Member DaveXR8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tai9a View Post
    i will definitely call you out for a service for paint correction this month mate. how well does your service remove medium to light scratches on black paint. plus how long does it take for a paint correction service. either stage 1 or 2. thanks
    For a black car I would recommend at least a Stage 2 but this all depends on how far you want to go with the correction and what type of condition your paint is in.
    If its just light webbing and swirls then a stage 2 should be able to do the job but if it is any worse than that then a full correction would be the go if you are after perfection. This can require anywhere from a 3-5 stage polish.
    I can come and check out your car to give you a better idea of what would be involved.

    Each stage of the correction usually averages about 2.5 hours and you have to add in the time which it takes to wash, clay and LSP application aswell.

    Shoot me a PM if you want me to check out your car.

    Cheers
    Dave
  9. #49
    Member Run-It-Hard's Avatar
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    How would you go about looking after carbon fibre? are there products you should not use etc?
  10. #50

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveXR8 View Post
    For a black car I would recommend at least a Stage 2 but this all depends on how far you want to go with the correction and what type of condition your paint is in.
    If its just light webbing and swirls then a stage 2 should be able to do the job but if it is any worse than that then a full correction would be the go if you are after perfection. This can require anywhere from a 3-5 stage polish.
    I can come and check out your car to give you a better idea of what would be involved.

    Each stage of the correction usually averages about 2.5 hours and you have to add in the time which it takes to wash, clay and LSP application aswell.

    Shoot me a PM if you want me to check out your car.

    Cheers
    Dave

    oh wow.
    sounds expensive to go stages 3 - 5 . well let me save up a bit more first. cause i have a lot going with the car soon in these next coming weeks. i need to budget costs. i wouldnt say things are extremely bad, there are some bigger scratches from tree branches off the side of road.

    ok well i work fulltime so its hard to catch a time to come see me. where abouts are u located , i can come see u depending on my hours.

    thanks.
    you can pm me your details if needs be.

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