Page 4 of 15 FirstFirst 123456789101114 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 144

Thread: Wheel Alignment: Specs and Theories

  1. #31
    Member CaptainColen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Pineal Gland.
    Daily
    180sx
    Posts
    1,801

    toe is on a different axis to camber so it does not effect it at all? Each track/purpose will determine what alignment you will want to be running. At the end of the day you will want to be running setup which is easy to handle rather then maximum outright mechanical grip. If your car is getting stuck in ruts which deliver it to the dirt and your battling to hold it onto a cambered road then obviously that setup is not for you, despite it providing the theoretically best handling. Getting a little less out of the car for 90% of the time is going to give you a more enjoyable experience.

    As far as trade off's are concerned rather they putting caster vs toe you should consider straight line stability vs turn in vs tyre wear. I have yet to test, but i suspect running toe in on a car with lots of camber will reduce the camber wearing away the inside of the tyre whilst toe out will worsen.

    I like caster as it gives you more feedback through the steering wheel as to the direction of the front wheels
  2. #32
    Grand Sword Bearer Trolls Royce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Daily
    .
    Name
    Chris
    Posts
    2,820

    Quote Originally Posted by munchhunch View Post
    I actually type castor first and then changed it to camber, camber is independent from toe, but the combination will make up a good set up.



    Ricki, how does toe in/out effect camber? Positives/Nevagtives on toe vs castor and what have people found is a good compromise?
    Toe and castor are completely different.

    Castor will give you dynamic camber as the wheels are turned.
  3. #33
    Grand Sword Bearer Trolls Royce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Daily
    .
    Name
    Chris
    Posts
    2,820

    http://www.ozebiz.com.au/racetech/theory/align.html

    Bit of a read, but explains the principles well.
  4. #34
    Member The Panda's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Daily
    esdubtwenny
    Name
    Cam
    Posts
    2,291

    Do large levels of castor affect streetability of a car?
  5. #35
    Member VTECMACHINE's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Daily
    Honda S2000 (AP2)
    2nd Car
    London Underground
    Name
    Rix
    Posts
    8,826

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock Brocaine View Post
    Castor will give you dynamic camber as the wheels are turned.
    That's what I meant by I think the guy meant Castor.

    More Castor allowed you to maintain/gain more camber through turn. ie: Castor is where is lies! You want to be a close to 0 degrees camber for straights, but you want camber as you go through corrners.


    Captain colen, castor is rad hey! It changed everything By going from 1 degree to 4 degree castor, camber on full lock increased from 1.5 -ve camber, to 3.5 -ve camber. Then the times at wakefield fell. I was so freaking amazed ey. Not to mention the driving feel, steering response and braking stablity.
    Regarding tyre wear, I was using Toyo T1R for 4.5 years, with 3.5mm toe out front, 1mm toe in rear, 3.0 - 3.5 degrees camber front, 1.5 -ve rear - and still had 30% of tyre left - I had done 2 trackdays on those tyres aswell. I swear car weight has so much to do with tyre wear. The evo has done 1 trackday with these hard as shit falkens and a 2000km's street driving and there is like 40% left. Camber and toe is conservative.
  6. #36
    Grand Sword Bearer Trolls Royce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Daily
    .
    Name
    Chris
    Posts
    2,820

    Quote Originally Posted by The Panda View Post
    Do large levels of castor affect streetability of a car?
    Steering weight. Excessive castor can make your steering feel heavier.

    Also, on most cars the method of adjusting castor is going to be your castor rods. If you shorten your castor rods, you move the wheel further forward in the arch which can cause them to hit your guard liners etc.

    Some vehicles need adjustable strut tops for castor adjustment, like FC RX7's, in which case you're moving the top of the shock back, instead of the bottom of the shock/hub forward. In this case, you're probably not going to notice the wheel moving forward or backward.
  7. #37
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NSW
    Daily
    MY09 4WD Petrol Hilux
    2nd Car
    Mitsubishi Evo VIII
    Name
    Alex
    Posts
    1,319

    Quote Originally Posted by AYCMACHINE View Post
    Interesting. Sounds like an extremely understeery setup.
    Really? What makes you say that?
    Mid Night Racing Team

    Mid Night Car Speciall #001
  8. #38
    Grand Sword Bearer Trolls Royce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Daily
    .
    Name
    Chris
    Posts
    2,820

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonba View Post
    Really? What makes you say that?
    Yeah, I was wondering that too. Looks pretty sensible actually.
  9. #39
    Member mrpham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    QLD
    Daily
    Daihatsu Feroza
    2nd Car
    Mazda MX-5 NA6
    Name
    John
    Posts
    721

    In a S-chassis, is the goal to adjust traction arms so that you eliminate all bump-steer? All is some bump-steer desirable?

    My car is going to get an alignment tomorrow so hopefully they will be able to sort it all out for me.
  10. #40
    Member mrpham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    QLD
    Daily
    Daihatsu Feroza
    2nd Car
    Mazda MX-5 NA6
    Name
    John
    Posts
    721

    Quote Originally Posted by eniryks View Post
    more goes in to bump steer then adjusting 1 arm, most of your bump steer is done off you tie rods which is what rose link tie rods where really made for so you could adjust them up and down to do bump steer, but some times you have to start moving steering arms and then that fuck's with your ackerman and the list goes on.

    if your bump steer is not to bad like 3mm @ 2M then i would just leave it alone as once you turn the steering wheel your bump steer is irrelevant any way, it only plays a part under brakes but if it doesnt squirm then you dont really have a issue
    I was initially thinking about this because when you adjust rear camber, toe changes and the traction arms might need adjustment too. This is all for my S15, which I guess is the same as the R32-R33, S13-S15.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •